Defibrilator training boost

Local Liberal Democrat councillors were pleased to help the Dringhouses Bowling Club secure a new defibrillator, along with free training in its use for eight club members.

The Bowling Club, which is based at York Racecourse Stables, was awarded £1,600 by the Dringhouses and Woodthorpe Ward Committee.
Liberal Democrat Councillor Ashley Mason, who is also a paramedic, offered to train the members in how to use the equipment, saving the club £350. York Racecourse was also kind enough to let the Bowling Club use their facilities for no charge for the training.

Cllr Ashley Mason (right) with Ray Lyall from Dringhouses Bowling Club

Cllr Ashley Mason said:
A person’s chance of survival decreases 10 per cent every minute that passes without defibrillation, so applying a defibrillator within the first four minutes of collapse means the patient has the best possible chance of surviving.”

Dementia activity sessions get underway

A Woodthorpe-based charity is to run themed activity sessions for people living with dementia. The first session, on the theme of ‘A day at the seaside’, is on Thursday 6 July from 1.30pm to 3.30pm at St James the Deacon church hall on Sherringham Drive – see poster below for details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dementia Yorkshire has received a grant from the Dringhouses & Woodthorpe ward committee to help support these monthly sessions. We wish them every success.

Residents invited to have their say on Wilberforce Trust development proposals

Local residents are invited to attend a drop-in session to have their say on proposals by the Wilberforce Trust to build 30 flats for its tenants on land it owns to the north of The Grove, off Tadcaster Road.

The proposals, which include a social/community hub for tenants and offices for the charity, will be on display at the Sunflower Centre at St Leonard’s Hospice on Thursday 6th July from 4.30pm to 8pm. A Wilberforce Trust leaflet (copied below) is being delivered to local homes to publicise the drop-in session.


The Wilberforce Trust is a York-based charity that provides specialist housing and support for people with visual impairments, sensory impairments and other disabilities. Its website can be viewed at www.wilberforcetrust.org.uk

In the most recent draft Local Plan, this piece of land had been provisionally allocated for residential extra care facilities in association with the Wilberforce Trust.

What’s on in York: Dementia Friends workshop @ Dringhouses Library

Dringhouses Library :

Tue 16 May :

2.00pm – 3.00pm :

Free, but booking required

Dementia Friend PicJoin Dementia Friends Champion Claire for a Dementia Friends session.

Dementia touches the lives of millions of people across the country. Dementia Friends was launched to tackle the stigma and lack of understanding that means many people with the condition experience loneliness and social exclusion.

The session is all about learning more about dementia and the small ways you can help. From getting in touch with someone you know living with dementia to wearing your badge with pride, every action counts.

Tickets available from any Explore Library or call Dringhouses Library on (01904 552674) or dringhouses@exploreyork.org.uk.

York backing World Pancreatic Cancer Day tomorrow (Friday 13th November)

click to view

click to view

Many people in York is supporting World Pancreatic Cancer Day on Friday 13th November which aims to raise awareness of pancreatic cancer – considered to be the little known disease – with the public.

It is estimated that 926 people around the world are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer every day, with 905 people will die from the disease every day across the world.

The number of diagnoses has continued to rise but there is still very low awareness of pancreatic cancer with over 60% of people surveyed recently knowing almost nothing about the disease.

World Pancreatic Cancer Day’s hopes to bring much-needed focus and attention to the disease, especially the need for increased symptom awareness and greater investment into research.  World Pancreatic Cancer Day encourages everyone to “see purple” on 13 November by wearing purple, lighting landmarks purple, using purple on social media channels etc.

City of York Council’s Executive Member for Adult Social Care and Health Councillor Carol Runciman said: “Raising awareness is the first step to action.  The more people who know about pancreatic cancer, the greater the opportunity and need will be for more research and for the development of better resources for those facing the disease.”

Pancreatic cancer is considered to be one of the deadliest cancers, with just two to 10% of those diagnosed surviving five years.  In the UK 71% of people cannot name a simple symptom of pancreatic cancer.

Pancreatic cancer is sometimes referred to as a “silent cancer” because the early symptoms are often quite vague.

  • Classic pancreatic cancer symptoms can include:
  • Painless jaundice (yellow skin/eyes, dark urine).
  • Weight loss which is significant and unexplained
  • Abdominal pain which is new and significant.

Other possible symptoms of pancreatic cancer:
• Pain in the upper abdomen that radiates to the back which is new, significant and persistent that is relieved by leaning forward
• Back pain
• Diabetes which is new-onset and not associated with weight gain
• Vague indigestion or abdominal discomfort
• Loss of appetite
• Nausea and vomiting
• Pain when eating

Not everyone will have all of these symptoms.  For example, those who have a tumour in the body or tail of the pancreas are unlikely to have painless jaundice.  All of these symptoms can have other causes, and there is not yet a reliable and easy test for pancreatic cancer.

If you have any of the symptoms of pancreatic cancer visit your GP.

For more information about World Pancreatic Cancer Day, visit www.worldpancreaticcancerday.org

York launches Breathe 2025 campaign to inspire a smokefree generation

City of York Council is urging people and organisations across York to sign up and support Breathe 2025, a new campaign to inspire children to grow up smoke-free and protected from health harms caused by tobacco.
click to view video

click to view video

While the region has the highest adult smoking prevalence in England (20.1% compared to an England average of 18%), only one in eight 15-year-olds smoke and the proportion of young smokers is dropping.

Within the next decade there could be a generation of children that don’t smoke.    .

City of York Council’s Executive Member for Adult Social Care and Health Councillor Carol Runciman said: “We want children who have started school this year to be the pioneers of a smokefree generation: today’s five year olds can be smokefree at 15 when they are preparing for their GCSEs and so can all the year groups following them.

“They can be smokefree when they leave school or college and as adults. Breathe 2025 is about how all of us can inspire and help them to make that happen.”
The campaign is being run by a collaboration of partners across Yorkshire and the Humber, including City of York Council and Public Health England.

People and organisations are being asked to show their support by going to the campaign website or Facebook page and signing up to one or more simple, practical actions. This could be pledging to watch and share the Breathe 2025 video, or promising to display a Breathe 2025 poster.  There are a range of simple actions to choose from, as individuals or on behalf of an organisation such as a school, GP or local business.

Councillor Runciman continues: “Giving children and young people the best start in life is a priority for City of York Council, parents, family members and many other organisations and communities in York – and not smoking is a great start so please go to the Breathe 2025 website and show your support.”

City of York Council’s Interim Director of Public Health, Sharon Stoltz said: “Evidence suggests that if young people don’t start using tobacco by the age of 26 they will almost certainly never start, so we have a great opportunity here to transform the health of our region and we can do it within the next 10 years.

“It is estimated that smoking in York costs society around £50.1m annually and smoking breaks cost businesses in York £24.2m each year.  Around one in two smokers die from a smoking-related illness.  If we can prevent young people from smoking that’s not just an investment in their health as individuals, it’s an investment in a healthier future for everyone.”

The Breathe 2025 website is at www.Breathe2025.org.uk