Dog fouling concerns on North Lane

In response to concerns raised by residents about dog fouling, a sign has been installed on North Lane in Dringhouses reminding irresponsible owners of the penalties of not picking up after their dog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sign has been funded from the Dringhouses & Woodthorpe Ward Committee budget.

Security patrols get underway in Woodthorpe

Local Lib Dem councillors have welcomed the start of daily security patrols in the Ashbourne Way / Summerfield Road area, following concerns from residents about anti social behaviour.

Cllr Ashley Mason with the patrol vehicle on Summerfield Road

The Dringhouses & Woodthorpe ward budget is being used to fund a six-month trial of daily visits by a Gough & Kelly security patrol with body-worn cameras. The aim is to gather evidence of the nature of the problems, with a view to informing a decision about whether a fixed CCTV camera would be beneficial.

Residents are being encouraged to take part in a survey, which has been set up by Gough & Kelly. It can be accessed at  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/TH7XT3Q

 

Woodthorpe residents encouraged to have their say on CCTV plans

Local Lib Dem councillors are encouraging residents to have their say on plans designed to tackle anti social behaviour in parts of Woodthorpe.

Example of a body-worn CCTV camera

Residents have expressed concern about vandalism and anti social behaviour in the Ashbourne Way and Summerfield Road area and also around the newly-refurbished playground at Woodthorpe Green.

In response, the Ward Budget is being used to fund a six-month trial of daily visits by a Gough & Kelly security patrol with body-worn cameras.

The aim is to gather evidence of the nature of the problems, with a view to informing a decision about whether a fixed CCTV camera would be beneficial.

The survey, which has been set up by Gough & Kelly, can be accessed at  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/TH7XT3Q

The questions posed in the survey are:

  1. Do you feel there is a need for patrols with body-worn video in the Summerfield Road / Ashbourne Way area?
  2. Would having patrols make you feel safer?
  3. Are you happy that patrols have been considered as a way of documenting evidence to support the installation of a fixed CCTV camera?
  4. Are you happy for images of you to be recorded and stored for 31 days?
  5. Can you think of incidents where CCTV would have been useful in the area?
  6. Do you have any other comments, questions or concerns?

Burglary on The Horseshoe

A house burglary took place on The Horseshoe on Sunday 17th June between 12:30 and 5:30pm when an individual entered a property and took various items.


 

 

 

 

 

North Yorkshire Police are appealing to residents to contact them if they saw anything suspicious between these times and suspect it was related to this incident. Please phone 101 to pass any relevant information

Fewer Community Police in York

A response to a Freedom of Information  request has indicated that front line PCSO numbers have dropped by more than half in York since 2016.

PCSOs passing out in 2014

Liberal Democrat Councillor Ashley Mason, who is currently serving as the Vice Chair to the Police & Crime Panel, recently submitted a Freedom of Information request to North Yorkshire Police Force. He wanted to know the number of community police officers patrolling the streets of the City.

In response, Cllr Mason was told that there are currently 25 front line PCSOs in York.

This compares to 64 in 2016.

Cllr Mason had also requested the figures for the last 10 years, but unfortunately, was told that this information was not recorded.

This revelation comes amidst growing concerns that the fall in police numbers, due to Government cuts, has lead to increases in crimes throughout England. Although this has been denied by Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, a leaked report from her own department, has suggested reductions in police numbers were “likely” to have led to the increase.

Earlier this year, PCC Julia Mulligan promised to look into the neighbourhood policing system in York, after many local councillors expressed concerns about the lack of local officers in their communities.

Councillor Ashley Mason, Liberal Democrat and Vice Chair of the Police & Crime Panel:

“PCSOs are a vital link between the police and the communities they serve.  To loose so many over two years is shocking.”

“It is interesting to see that the Police and Crime Commissioner say that numbers high, which suggests that some PCSO’s are being taken away from the City of York.”

“I will be writing to the Police and Crime Commissioner to express my concerns and insist that her review of the force begin as soon as possible”

PCC Julia Mulligan has responded by saying that the North Yorkshire Police website, from which the figures in the FOI response were taken, was incorrect.

Councillor Ashley Mason responded by saying:

“I sent through a request to North Yorkshire Police for them to confirm to me the number of PCSOs working in York. I was a little surprised in the first instance when I was only referred to the North Yorkshire Police’s website, as the numbers indicated were low.

“I queried this with the force’s Civil Disclosure Unit and was again directed to North Yorkshire Police’s website, where I was told that the numbers of PCSOs could be found under the details of the ‘York North’ and ‘York City’ Neighbourhood Teams. As indicated on the website, only 25 PCSOs are detailed.

“If as the Police & Crime Commissioner has said that these numbers are incorrect, then this should be absolutely reflected on the North Yorkshire Police Force website, particularly if Councillors and members of the public are going to be directed to the website. Neighbourhood policing is extremely important to communities here in York and therefore, it is essential that information provided to the public is correct.”

Askham Bar flytipping investigated and goes to court

In August 2017 Cllr Stephen Fenton took a photo (below) of flytipping at the Askham Bar recycling banks and reported it to City of York Council’s Neighbourhood Enforcement team. They investigated, and a case went to the Magistrates Court on 2nd January. The defendant failed to attend and so the Court issued a warrant for the person’s arrest.


It’s good to know that these cases are pursued where evidence can be found. Flytipping can be reported to neo@york.gov.uk for investigation.

Neighbourhood policing in the spotlight

Local residents have expressed concern over the current condition of neighbourhood policing in York.

During a public meeting on local policing held on Tuesday, residents challenged the police and underlined their irritation at the current level of communication they receive from the police and their presence in the community.

Many communities have been left frustrated by the lack of communication and are often unaware of police activity in local areas.  Some residents highlighted the lack of police representation in the community as the main cause of the breakdown in communication between police and local people.

Deputy Chief Constable, Lisa Winward, stated that Neighbourhood policing was ‘the bedrock’ of policing in North Yorkshire Police and admitted that the police needed to be more organised and dedicate more time to local people.

It was also revealed that a neighbourhood policing survey will be launched next year to gather feedback from local people, with a view to improving overall neighbourhood policing.

Cllr Ashley Mason said:

“I am pleased that the meeting provided local residents the opportunity to communicate their concerns directly with senior officials in the police.

Every resident deserves to feel safe in their own community and when you begin to see less police in that community, the feeling of safety begins to diminish.

Neighbourhood policing is successful when local police officers build strong relationships with the communities they serve, however, local people are reporting that the police are no longer visible in the community.  This must be reversed.

It is important that the police take on board residents and I welcome Deputy Chief Constable Winward’s commitment to, once again, build those essential relationships with local communities.”

The public meeting on local policing was organised by Liberal Democrat Councillor, Cllr Ashley Mason, and attended by Deputy Chief Constable Lisa Winward, Superintendent Adam Thompson, Chief Inspector Charlotte Bloxham and members of the public.

 

Concerns raised over the 101 Service by Cllr Ashley Mason

On the panel, Commander Charlotte Bloxham (far left), Deputy Chief Constable Lisa Winward (left of centre), Cllr Ashley Mason (right of centre) and Superintendent Adam Thompson (right).

Concerns and confusion continue to persist regarding the performance of 101 service in York.

During a public meeting organised by Liberal Democrat Councillor Ashley Mason, residents were vocal in their displeasure over the quality of service they have received after calling 101, with many commenting that police responses were too slow or, in some instances, did not show up at all.

In response, Chief Inspector Charlotte Bloxham, head of the York Control Room, highlighted that November 2017 was the busiest month on record for 999 calls and due to the sheer volume of calls, this had an adverse effect on the force’s ability to respond to 101 calls.  However, the Police did apologise to residents who had not been provided the appropriate level of service and commitments were made to improve localised responses to 101 calls.

In addition, a number of residents underlined their unhappiness that charges were being applied to the national 101 service, despite residents being actively encouraged to log calls via 101.  Deputy Chief Constable, Lisa Winward, concurred that residents should not be charged for logging calls and agreed to take this issue to the National Police Board.

Cllr Ashley Mason said:

“The 101 service is extremely important for many local communities and it is crucial that it operates to a high standard  Calls to the 101 service must result in police action, where necessary, and I am pleased that the Police took onboard the concerns of residents and apologised to those who had been let down by the service.

Looking forward, it is encouraging that Deputy Chief Constable will take the issue of call charges to the Police’s National Board and commitments have been made to improve responses to 101 calls.  We must continue to scrutinise the performance of the 101 service, in order to identify where improvements are required.  Excellent standards must be consistently maintained to deliver the safety residents are entitled to.